Anti-Israel North Korea Can Help Iran Around Nuclear-Deal Restrictions

Anti-Israel North Korea Can
Help Iran Around Nuclear-Deal
Restrictions

On July 14, 2015, Iran and the United States announced a deal according to which Iran agreed to limit its nuclear-enrichment capacity and reduce the number of its centrifuges. Why should Iran have been willing to slow down its nuclear program when the destruction of Israel has always been a priority for its rulers?

Tehran, in all likelihood, agreed to these restrictions because North Korea can fill the gap. You may not know this, but North Korea has fought against Israel before. In 1973, North Korea sent not only planes but pilots to Egypt to fight against Israel during the Yom Kippur War, as reported in the Asia Times.

The United States once was concerned about the North Korea-Iran relationship, according an article by Eli J. Lake and Richard Sale that appeared in the Middle East Times on June 22, 2001. Somehow, the United States has stopped worrying, but the problem has not gone away. In the early 2000s, North Korea built a nuclear facility in Syria — one of Iran’s strongest allies. Israel attacked this site, the al-Kibar nuclear facility, on September 6, 2007, and destroyed it.

The world has never known about North Korea’s planes and pilots fighting against Israel. Even Israel has forgotten. We shouldn’t forget. North Korea is providing the nuclear materials that Iran has agreed to surrender. Furthermore, North Korea is firing submarine-launched ballistic missiles. On April 23, 2016, it tested such a missile and claimed that the launch was successful.

In 1955, the Bandung Conference took place in Indonesia, where Asian and African countries met in order to unite against the United States and its allies. That was the beginning of the Marxist-Islamic Alliance. The alliance seems to make no sense. Marxists are atheists and Muslims are religious. What both doctrines have in common, however, is a commitment to extremism. Marxist countries have always persecuted Muslims within their own borders (Chechnya is an example, among many), and Islamic countries have not tolerated Communist parties in their own lands. On the international level, however, they are united against the forces they perceive as their enemies — freedom and Israel. This union is held together by blind faith.

Nowhere in the world is faith more blind than in North Korea, the one remaining country on earth that is totally committed to Marxism. People think of North Korea as a crazy monarchy, which it is. Yet it nevertheless remains an absolutely Marxist state.

This article appeared in The Algemeiner, May 30, 2016